poboh:


Chiswick Park, 1956, Mary Fedden. English (1915 - 2012)

poboh:

Chiswick Park, 1956, Mary Fedden. English (1915 - 2012)

(via telkb)

artgalleryofontario:

Model Totem Pole, c. 1890-1905Edenshaw, Charles(Attributed to)ArgilliteOverall: 21 x 4.7 x 5.8 cmGift of Roy G. Cole, Rosseau, Ontario, 1997© 2014 Art Gallery of Ontario

artgalleryofontario:

Model Totem Pole, c. 1890-1905
Edenshaw, Charles(Attributed to)
Argillite
Overall: 21 x 4.7 x 5.8 cm
Gift of Roy G. Cole, Rosseau, Ontario, 1997
© 2014 Art Gallery of Ontario

(via terresauvage)

pathandpuddle:


Folk art inspired Still Life by peregrine blue on Flickr.

pathandpuddle:

Folk art inspired Still Life by peregrine blue on Flickr.

(via telkb)

workman:

ukiyoecats:

Tsukioka Yoshitoshi 月岡芳年

sugarmeows:

The Annunciation (detail) from the main panel of the altarpiece of the life of Mary in San Domenico, Cortona (1433–34) – Fra Angelico (1395–1455)

sugarmeows:

The Annunciation (detail) from the main panel of the altarpiece of the life of Mary in San Domenico, Cortona (1433–34) – Fra Angelico (1395–1455)

(Source: paleologus, via lacalaveracatrina)

arsvitaest:

Butterfly-shaped box
Origin: JapanDate: 19th centuryMedium: Lacquer with gold, silver and mother-of-pearlLocation: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

arsvitaest:

Butterfly-shaped box

Origin: Japan
Date: 19th century
Medium:
Lacquer with gold, silver and mother-of-pearl
Location: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

(via ornaments-of-the-world)

denisforkas:

Martin Schongauer - Leaf ornament (thistle). 1470-1490

denisforkas:

Martin Schongauer - Leaf ornament (thistle). 1470-1490

(Source: drakontomalloi, via senjukannon)

xwilethecoyotex:

Bye bye blackbird.

xwilethecoyotex:

Bye bye blackbird.

(via senjukannon)

showslow:

London-based artist Zadok Ben David created this incredible installation using 12,000 cut steel botanical specimens modeled from old textbook illustrations, each embedded in a thin layer of sand. On first encountering the sprawling array of plants they appear completely black, thus the installation’s title: Blackfield. However when viewed from the opposite side, a field of black turns into a wall of color.

(via a-million-art-blogs)

windypoplarsroom:

Julius Hüther
"Sonnenblumen"

windypoplarsroom:

Julius Hüther

"Sonnenblumen"

(via beverleyshiller)

antiguas-finest:

Antigua, Guatemala (2006) - Alfombras y procesión de viernes santo by anajulz http://instagram.com/p/m5LHwxqKVg/

antiguas-finest:

Antigua, Guatemala (2006) - Alfombras y procesión de viernes santo by anajulz http://instagram.com/p/m5LHwxqKVg/

handeyemagazine:

Bronze botanical specimen from Cape Town’s Table Mountain by artist, surfer dude and botanist Nic Bladen.
From HAND/EYE’s 09/South Africa issue, available at www.handeyemagazine.com/buy

handeyemagazine:

Bronze botanical specimen from Cape Town’s Table Mountain by artist, surfer dude and botanist Nic Bladen.

From HAND/EYE’s 09/South Africa issue, available at www.handeyemagazine.com/buy

artburgac:

David Konigsberg

artburgac:

David Konigsberg

(via beverleyshiller)

thirdorgan:

Hans Erni / Dimanche d’automne, 1933

thirdorgan:

Hans Erni / Dimanche d’automne, 1933

(via blastedheath)

atsoukalidis:

Central mosque under the Acropolis.
“Tsisdarakis Mosque http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tsisdarakis_Mosque (Greek: Τζαμί Τσισδαράκη) is an 18th-century Ottoman mosque, now functioning as a museum, in central Athens, Greece. The mosque is standing in front of the Monastiraki station. Tsisdarakis was voevod / governor of Athens in the middle of the eighteenth century, who constructed this mosque in 1759, according to an inscription on the mosque. He brought to this mosque some columns from the Temple of Olympian Zeus. But as he did this without due permission of the Sultan, he was heavily fined and chased out from his position.”

Another story says that “built in 1759 by the governor Tzistarakis during the second period Ottoman occupation (1689-1821), the Tzistarakis Mosque is one of the few Muslim monuments remaining in Athens. The limestone used in its construction was rumoured to have been procured from a column from the Olympieion, but research has shown that a column from Hadrian’s Library was the actual source.”

"The minaret of the mosque was destroyed after the outbreak of the Greek Revolution 1821. After independence, the mosque was used by the army in various ways, including as a prison and barracks. In 1915 it was partly rebuilt and was used as "Museum of Greek Handwork", while in 1923 as "National Museum of Decorative Arts". From 1959 on it became the Museum of Greek Traditional Art."